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Analysis of Diesel Particulate Matter Health Risk Disparities in Selected U.S. Harbor Areas

Categorized Under: Health, Research + Evaluation

 

 

In this peer-reviewed article, published in the American Journal of Public Health, ICF experts found that the most important factor for predicting diesel particulate matter (DPM) intake fractions for harbor activities is the proximate population density. Evidence has shown that people living in close proximity to major transportation sources, such as roads, experience higher exposure to pollutants directly emitted by motor vehicles. At least one study has suggested that residents nearby marine harbor areas are exposed to significantly higher concentrations of pollution, including particulate matter. Our twofold purpose was (1) to compare harbor areas across the United States with respect to the DPM inhalation intake fraction, that is, the intake-to-emissions ratio; and (2) to estimate the size and demographic composition of populations experiencing enhanced carcinogenic health risks as a result of exposure to DPM emitted from activities in U.S. harbor areas.


Authored By

  • Arlene Rosenbaum

    Technical DirectorICF International

    Arlene Rosenbaum specializes in air dispersion modeling, population exposure to air pollutants, and environmental justice assessments.

    Ms. Rosenbaum manages air quality and population exposure analyses for the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and regional government agencies. She has developed population exposure models and methods for EPA and the California Air Resources Board (CARB). She has served as a peer reviewer for EPA programs and projects and as a member of the CARB Community Health Modeling Work Group and advisory panel for Comparative Risk Analysis. She was elected by her colleagues to serve as a Councilor for the International Society for Exposure Analysis (ISEA).

Insight Details

Published: Dec 1, 2011
Authors: , Seth Hartley, Chris Holder
Source: American Journal of Public Health, Supplement 1, 2011, Vol 101, No. S1
 
 
 
 

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